Secrets of McClellanville and the Death of Brittanee Drexel

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When loss of life is involved, particularly in a cruel, violent manner, it is only natural that there is public outrage. People rush to judgment to try to justify their opinions in the heat of the moment – in the acute phase. Concerning the location in which a crime occurred, we often broad brush all residents and their culture as inherently evil. This is wrong. No town or city should be thought of as a reincarnation of White Pines Bay – the fictitious location of the Bates Motel or Amityville, New York, just because a criminal element has frequented a town.

After years of searches and investigation by multiple law enforcement agencies, the rural town of McClellanville, South Carolina has unequivocally been pinpointed as the place where 17-year-old Brittanee Drexel spent her final days on earth, rather than her upstate New York home. If this is so with irrefutable evidence, we must believe it. But, in the hearts of the Drexel family and friends, this cannot be imagined, without a perpetrator, without her precious body.

Given this information, it does not mean that all residents of McClellanville are heartless. We have to ask, why have someone not come forward, particularly with a $25,000 reward publicized for credible information.  If I had to speculate, perhaps, they may be scared, frightened of retribution. Their silence could mean that they don’t have a good reason to trust law enforcement. Possibly residents feel that any information they may have “in the cobwebs of their mind” times 7 years ago is insignificant. Possibly they do not believe that offering any information will lead to a monetary reward for them personally, so why risk it?

Such is the thinking that tries men’s souls and keeps families and law enforcement constantly on edge.

History and Demographics

128657464991113191800301197_BRITTANEE_DREXELMcClellanville, situated in northeast Charleston County is on US Route 17 heading 23 miles northeast to Georgetown and 38 miles southwest to Charleston. McClellanville is populated by 500 or so people – a Mayberry RFD by some standards. This town, in the parish of St. James –Santee was incorporated into the Church of England in 1706, but settled by the French as early as 1605. It has always been an agricultural economy. They feature many historic properties, small town life, Bible school and their trademark is their shrimping fleet and seafood industry.  Natural resources include Jeremy Creek, running through the center of town, and south toward the Intercoastal Waterway adjacent to Romain National Wildlife Refuge (66,287 acres).  Nearly 57% are age 25 to 64, with almost 20% – age 65 + years.

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They showed their resilience in 1989 when Hurricane Hugo destroyed much of the town. People were saved by crawling into a space above a false ceiling in the high school-storm shelter.

What Happened to Brittanee?

It doesn’t make sense to me that a possible human trafficker or sexual predator would “stick around Mayberry” for several days with an innocent teenager who could clearly be distinguished by her northeastern dialect without notice.  Crime never makes any sense… Brittanee was abducted and held against her will we are told. Was she “free to do errands for this man” but clearly under his control around town under threat of death, or forced to perform other favors in a hotel or abandoned property?  Did the perpetrator have ties to McClellanville or was he a transient predator? Did Brittanee reach out and try to secretly ask for help which ultimately lead to her death? Was she persuaded with initial sweet talk and lies that her family didn’t care about her and to come on an adventure? We may never know.

As a northeasterner, I drove from Myrtle Beach through McClellanville to Charleston a couple of years ago and barely noticed this nondescript town.

I thought this at the time, as I am a suburban –city slicker at heart. Now, I will never forget as it has a much deeper meaning now.

How do we encourage people to have e a conscience for the betterment of others no matter what the risk? This is God-fearing, church going folks after all!  It would truly help if the media put a positive spin on proactivity. The little town ofMcClellanville could be known forever as “the town that saved a family, saved a girl with such promise from New York!” They did the right thing for missing persons everywhere!  Let us all hope and pray that they do!

maxresdefaultProfiles and Contact Information for Brittanee-

http://helpfindbrittaneedrexel.com/submit-a-confidential-tip/

http://www.ncmissingpersons.org/fbi-offers-reward-in-09-brittanee-drexel-case-rochester-teen-likely-killed/

Missing Persons – The Unchosen Path of the Elderly Who Disappear

 

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“To keep the heart unwrinkled, to be hopeful, kindly, cheerful, reverent –

that is to triumph over old age.”  Thomas Bailey Aldrich

Numbers don’t lie…

On average, 90,000 people are missing in the USA at any given time, according to staff at the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System-NamUs, a national database for missing people.

According to updated statistics (February 2015) presented at caregiver.org:

In 2012, 14.8% of the 65+ population were reported to be below the poverty level. Among the population aged 65+, 69% will develop disabilities before they die, and 35% will eventually enter a nursing home.

Most but not all persons in need of long-term care are elderly. Approximately 63% are persons aged 65 and older (6.3 million); the remaining 37% are 64 years of age and younger (3.7 million).

“The prevalence of cognitive impairment among the older population increased over the past decade, while the prevalence of physical impairment remains unchanged.”

Against this backdrop, there remains no hard statistics related to the number of elderly persons who go missing each year in all categories and circumstances. We do have snapshots.   In July 2013, Journalist David Lohr wrote about the number of missing persons who have wandered off as a consequence of one of the better-known forms of dementia – Alzheimer’s disease.  According to the article in the Huffington Post,

There has been a steady increase in such reported cases from non-profit organizations.

“There’re approximately 125,000 search-and-rescue missions where volunteer teams are deployed for missing Alzheimer’s patients every year,” said Kimberly Kelly, founder and director of Project Far From Home, an Alzheimer’s education program designed for law enforcement and search and rescue” personnel.”

Dealing with a missing person with cognitive impairments requires special skills and knowledge regarding how to search and locate these victims efficiently.

Some elderly persons are “sharp as a tack” at 80; other’s mental faculties can begin to decline at 50; Still others can function with some independence into their 90’s and beyond. It all depends on a combination of genetics, environment, intellect, and lifestyle.

I worked with seniors for many years in clinical settings such as hospitals, nursing homes, group homes and state institutions.  No matter the circumstance, I learned from each patient. Whether their personality was “cranky mean” or “sweet as pie,” they all had histories and a lesson to offer me. Professionally, they were a different, preferred challenge, compared to working with kids.

If one peruses the wall of missing persons on the website of the Cue Center for Missing Persons, it doesn’t take much scrolling before several elderly missing persons are located, intermixed with all of the other missing persons of varying ages. My goal is to simply highlight a handful in this category. Too often the general public treats the elderly as “disposable people” rather than persons from whom we can learn a great deal and deserve respect for their contributions and sacrifices in life.

Backstories – to the Following Missing Persons – Included in this list is a healthy, hardy walker who went missing at a campground, a woman who cashed a check at her bank and was never seen again, a man who was dropped off at his condominium and never located, a women who frequented bus trips to New York and often went off on her own as a “free spirit”, not wanting to stay with the group. They range in age from 65 to 85 from several different geographic locations across the country. One has been missing for 12 years, others less time. One day missing is too long!  PLEASE, review the profiles and study the circumstances and photos of each person – Bonnie McFadden, Floyd Price, Sandra Love Quay, Deward Killion. I encourage you to share this blog far and wide, as they are very important people who should NEVER be forgotten “just because they may be considered old.”

CUE CENTER FOR MISSING PERSONS PROFILES:

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Bonnie McFadden

Missing from Arkansas

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Deward Killion

Missing from Oregon

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Floyd Price

Missing from Mississippi

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Sandra Love Quay

Missing from New York

 

“I love the elderly… After all, I will be one among them in about 30 years”

(Ladyjustice- 2016)

 

 

 

 

References-

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2014/09/23/missing-persons-children-numbers/16110709/

https://www.caregiver.org/selected-long-term-care-statistics

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/26/wandering-alzheimers-_n_3653267.html

Three Missing Girls From Connecticut – A Lifetime Ago or was it Yesterday?

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Debra Spickler, Janice Pockett and Lisa White missing from Tolland County, CT

 

Shattered Lives Radio recently featured the cases of three missing girls from Tolland County, CT. Appearing on the episode were family members and investigators who updated listeners on their latest efforts to solve the cases and return the girls to their families.

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When we think of the late 1960’s and early 1970’s, it was a different time as compared to 2016. Living life was less complicated, free-spirited, trusting, even innocent. And yes, there was turmoil and a revolution of change all at the same time! There was the Vietnam War raging, civil rights marches in the south, an explosion of creative expression from the music world – the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, folk music, Woodstock, campus protests, marijuana and psychedelic drugs to “free the mind” and “flower power.”

On the home front, in our neighborhoods and backyards, our parents never gave a thought to shady people lurking in the shadows or those not to trust.  We were sent outside to play, perhaps for the entire day, but you had better be back for supper!

No one locked their doors. Children went off on their own and DID accept rides from strangers.  They ran away from home. They hitchhiked to their next destination down the road, in a fearless, invincible way.  Those children were classified as juveniles, they ran away, probably to return in a few hours, so why worry? They were arrested for truancy, underage drinking and the like.  No doubt children were abducted, molested, and were also victims of human trafficking (although this term would not evolve for many years).

So where did three young girls from Eastern Connecticut, specifically Tolland County, the Vernon- Rockville area, or those visiting the area, fit into this backdrop?

Missing girls

Debra Spickler was 13 years old from Mystic, CT visiting her aunt in Vernon CT. Last seen on July 24, 1968, at Henry Park, Debra and her cousin were walking towards the area of the local swimming pool. The two girls became separated.  Debra’s cousin looked for her afterwards, but she has never been seen again.

Janice Pocket was 7 years old in 1973.  She left her house at 3 p.m. on her bike, to retrieve a butterfly she had left under a rock.  Her mother retrieved her bike about a half mile away, but Janice was never seen nor heard from again.

Lisa Joy White, 13, lived in Vernon, CT and went to visit a friend in the Rockville section of Vernon in the evening of November 1. 1974. After visiting her friend Lisa began walking up Prospect Street towards the center of Rockville alone. That was the last time she had been seen.

 

Important Information

No physical evidence has ever been identified in any of these three cases which span from 1968 to 1974. The only piece of evidence, which was located in Janice Pocket’s disappearance, was her bicycle which was unable to be processed.

The Cold Case Squad meets as a group monthly and has uncovered dozens of leads and tips with thousands of old documents to review and electronically scan.

As part of their evidentiary search, they are most interested in obtaining any photos or videos taken during the summer of 1968 in the location of Henry Park, in Vernon, CT, particularly depicting landscape and people in the background at events occurring in the park where Debra Spickler went missing.

Any information will help build the culture of this time frame.

The public should be assured that this is an open-ended, ACTIVE investigation in which all possibilities will be considered.  In addition, a collective $150,000 Reward is being offered for information. 

Guests Appearing on Shattered Lives Radio

  1. Daniel Cargill- Retired Ct State Trooper; Lead Cold Case Analyst; Tolland County Cold Case Squad;
  2. Lt. William Meier, Vernon Police Department; Began as 2014 Investigator with the Tolland County Cold Case Squad;
  3. Janelle Candelaria- Criminal Intelligence Analyst, Department of Criminal Justice, Office of the Chief State’s Attorney, Rocky Hill, CT;
  4. Mary Engelbrecht- Younger sister of Victim Janice Pocket;
  5. Aprille Falletti- Younger sister of  Victim Lisa Joy White

 

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Contact with information:

To send material contact dcj.tollandcounty.coldcase@ct.gov

Social Media from the Families of the Tolland County Missing Girls and Contact Information:

Mary’s Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/Janice-Pockett-missing-since-July-26-1973-110441258981451/

Aprille’s Facebook Page – https://www.facebook.com/Lisa-Joy-White-age-13-missing-since-November-1-1974-788363764535343/

Every missing person is somebody’s child

(Monica Caison, Founder of the Cue Center for Missing Persons)  

 

The CUE Center for Missing Persons – Paving the Way through Grace- for the Families 2016

 

“The number of reported missing individuals has become a silent epidemic with the open roadways, waterways, and scenic wood lines used as open graveyards. They are horrific graveyards to which no one is paying attention.  Reports of Missing Persons exceed 800.000 annually, leaving nothing more than a path of devastation felt by thousands of families left behind, to linger an unknown fate.” Monica Caison 

Snapshots in Time-

paving-the-way-fuzzy11-e1448040883768Founder, Monica Caison – Honed her skills in missing person’s case management and counseling families through intuitive knowledge and 23 years of “ground pounding,” covering thousands of hours in the woods, and every terrain, on the road, with phone calls, and home visits. Over the years, she has built an impressive network of colleagues in law enforcement and other arenas, enlisting their help with the sole purpose of finding missing persons and unsolved homicides.

Hugs, tears and joyful experiences are indelibly seared into her memory. Ask about a specific case, and she has an encyclopedic recall of details!   She knows her strengths, and knows when and to whom to delegate.  She delivers her brand of compassion combined with a sense of reality and urgency for new families, for they do not know the journey and have to be schooled rapidly. Surrounded by advocates across the country, Monica customizes her approach with every case and perseveres until there is resolution.

Her skills shone brightly at the 12th Annual Conference in Wilmington, NC.

INVESTIGATION SKILLS- Huddled in small groups, State Coordinators listened intently to a previously solved case.  During this “think on your feet” exercise, selected facts were given and we were asked to identify the most important information in five minutes in order most effectively proceed with the case. Ideas, questions, clarifications were tossed around participants. In the end, we learned many lessons about how difficult case management is when time is a precious commodity.

A CAUTIONARY TALE – A Sunday morning tutorial by Monica stressed the importance of the actions of the first person on the scene will set the tone for the entire investigation.  Preconceived ideas, your history with similar cases, your feelings about investigators can color and often times lead the case down the wrong path with damaging effects that can take months to rectify.

(Without the proper experience) “The road to hell is paved with good intentions.” St Bernard of Clairvaux  

Sometimes it’s good to throw you in the water to see if you will sink or swim… that’s how we learn!

PRESENTERS- The air was “electric with anticipation” for the new topics and new speakers –

We so appreciate the talented and diverse array of presenters who gave of their time so selflessly in impart their knowledge and insights to assist those who work with missing persons and homicides.  For a detailed account of their bios refer to-

http://www.ncmissingpersons.org/national-conference-2/CUE Collage

 

Wesley Clark– Former Connecticut State Police Detective and Supervisor with 22 years experience with the State police Major Crimes Squad, and Internal Affairs. Since 2009, his focus has been to train law enforcement in innovative approaches regarding interviewing and interrogation of suspects; 

“Sometimes when you push someone, you find out who that person really is.” Keith Ablow- Murder Suicide

Timothy Palmbach – As of 2013, Professor Palmbach has been engaged with the implementation of advanced forensic investigative methods in the war against trafficking in persons (TIP) and related issues such as counter terrorism. He worked with non-governmental and government officials to employ the collection of DNA based evidence during active, undercover investigations involving cases of human trafficking in the countries of Nepal and Costa Rica.  In 2004, he joined the faculty of the University of New Haven as an Associate Professor and Chair of the Forensic Science Department.

He was Executive Director of the Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science. In that capacity, he built and trained law enforcement personnel throughout the world. His credentials also include being a Major of the Connecticut State Police/Commanding Officer/Director for the Division of Scientific Services, Department of Public Safety Laboratory; He served as a Detective and then Sergeant with the Major Crime Squad, and earning his JD from the University of CT Law School.

“You can choose to look the other way but you can never say again, you did not know.” William Wiberforce”

Michael StreedInstructor: Sergeant (Ret.) is an internationally-recognized forensic facial imaging expert based in Southern California with 35 years experience of law enforcement combined with his forensic artist skills to large police departments across the country. He also owns SketchCop Solutions, LLC – Law Enforcement’s Source for Facial Imaging and Biometric Identification, managing an innovative consulting business to law enforcement and private entities. He is the author of the book, “Sketchcop.”

“The ultimate mystery is one’s own self” Sammy Davis, Jr.

Michael Melson- Founder/President of Hawk Analytics–a company that develops applications that extract rapid answers and compelling visual evidence from location-based data, worked in the cell phone industry for over a decade  as an engineer with an advanced degree in software architecture with over 25 years cumulative experience.  He began developing software tools to better visualize the records after working with law enforcement as a pilot and search volunteer for missing persons.2011 was a landmark year in which he assisted solving a missing person cold case the first time entirely through phone records. In 2013, the first commercially available version of those software tools was launched as CellHawk.

“The cell phone has become the adult’s transitional object, replacing the toddler’s teddy bear for comfort and a sense of belonging.” Margaret Heffernan, Author, International Businesswoman 

Steph Watts – Producer–Journalist, specializing in profiling Cold Case Crimes, Homicide, Missing Persons, whose uncompromising standards assist families in creating a true awareness of the issues surrounding crime victims.  His investigative work has been instrumental in discovery and compelling coverage in such cases as the Kathleen Savio- Drew Peterson trial, Scott Peterson, Casey Anthony trials, Mathew Sheppard murder, the trial of cult leader Warren Jeffs, in addition to his contributions for many cable TV series.

“We don’t go into journalism to be popular. It is our job to seek the truth and put constant pressure on our leaders until we get answers” Helen Thomas – Former White House Correspondent

Jon Liebermanis an Emmy award-winning investigative correspondent, host, producer, author and victim advocate. He is a Board member of PAVE -Project Against Violent Encounters http://pavebennington.org/about-pave/.  Jon is President of Command Communications – a full service communications firm. He has also created and executive produced original video series for the web and consulted with major corporations and media on content development and execution. Jon has filed hundreds of reports on fugitives across the country and abroad for the FOX TV show “America’s Most Wanted.”

Objective journalism and an opinion column are about as similar as the Bible and Playboy magazine.” Walter Cronkite

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The Families – Approximately 350 persons registered for this year’s Conference, a percentage of whom were missing person or homicide family members turned volunteers, and Coordinators. There’s nothing like the “gravitational pull” of tragedy to bring like people together forever…

1) Harriet Rivers – On behalf of her Missing Daughter – Ebonee Spears –

A Smiling Face Adorns the City of Wilmington Hoping for Answers!

“It’s just like the city opened up and swallowed my child whole” were the words Harriet used to describe the mysterious disappearance of Ebonee.  Ebonee is a single mom with a young child, who went missing after being seen about 10:45 pm outside her Wilmington home.  Prior to that time, she went to the Wilmington Police Department and tried to make a call using their phone and was frustrated when it would not operate and left, according to the officer on duty.  News sources via her mother report that Ebonee was on an anti-depressant for Lupus and had been acting strangely in the days leading up to that night. In addition, her boyfriend, father of her child, went to her apartment and noted her car was in the driveway, her purse inside, but no cell phone and no Ebonee.

Her best friend, Coquitta Whitaker, owner of a local hair salon said, “She’s so responsible. This is not like her.” Ebonee was also a temporary employee at the University of North Carolina- Wilmington in their history department last spring and summer.  Faculty was impressed with her work ethic and dedication to her child.

A billboard campaign was initiated by the CUE Center for Missing Persons at the beginning of March in six strategic locations throughout Wilmington.  Regarding the effectiveness of billboards, according to Monica Caison, “they become larger than life and get so much more attention.” In fact, Ebonee’s face and demographic information will be seen for eight seconds 500 times a day through the rotation of the six billboards. The billboards will remain with her information as long as needed.

Anyone with information concerning Spears or her disappearance may contact official sources including the Wilmington Police Department at 910-343-3609 or anonymously submit a tip via Text-A-Tip. Send “Tip708” and the information to 274637 (CRIMES). The WPD is offering a $5,000 reward for information.

Ebonee’s Cue Center Profile: http://www.ncmissingpersons.org/index.php?s=Ebonee+Spears

2)  Gretchen Ring on Behalf of her Missing Daughter- Heidi Ring , Chico California-

Gretchen Ring is a 72 year old mother tormented by the ups and downs of her former child, Heidi, She was described as someone  “with a very big heart who helped everyone,” but sadly, could not help herself. Heidi was trapped in the endless cycle of mental illness and physical impairments such as migraines and a seizure disorder. To ease the pain, she smoked marijuana and then “graduated” to harder drugs which became the vehicle of her downward spiral including homelessness. However, Heidi, then 37, always checked in with family up until June 2005.   Reaching out to the “hobo network” as Gretchen called it, and spending all of her money to try to get Heidi on an even keel, did not help in the long run.

A dedicated investigator, Luis Parker, now 84, generated many leads that seemingly went nowhere all the way to Oregon. Tell tale signs that Heidi was not merely within the underground of homelessness, but truly missing was the fact that she did not retrieve her prescriptions or government assistance check.

Seven years came and went with her family diligently looking for her, while at the same time, rumor had it that Heidi didn’t want to be found by her family which only served to alienate all parties. But still, there was a mother’s unwavering love, a mother who spent her last dime on this thankless unending search.

Heidi’s remains were found adjacent to a boat ramp at Ord Bend Park in July 2012, and they were identified as hers in October of 2012. However, the circumstances are still unknown. Was it a homicide, or was foul play involved? This question kept Gretchen awake at night. It also has given her the desire to help others in the cycle of homelessness and to create a deeper awareness by telling Heidi’s story. The pain and sacrifice is etched on her face. But she states, “Maybe I can help someone out, somehow, with their journey in this unforgiving landscape of pain that families are in.”

3) National Candlelight Service- Featured Guest Speaker– Dawn Drexel on behalf of her Missing Daughter, Brittanee Drexel

There is a  pervasive sense of honor that is in the air when one attends this event. It is characterized by a special police escort throughout the entire route, much care, coordination and participation by so many volunteers is evident; the Wilmington River flowing adjacent to rows of chairs, flowers, music, speeches from the heart, candles, music, awards, prayers… and a veiled wall soon to be revealed, bearing witness to the many missing persons yet to be found in the future!

A mother stands at the podium and reads words from the heart. ‘Words that cut like a knife; Words that discuss how she has coped, her pride in family, her perseverance, her gratitude to the Cue Center and all of the volunteers and the legacy the disappearance of her daughter has created as a model for other families to come.  The milestone of seven years has brought both bitter reminders of the loss in Dawn Drexel’s life. On the positive side, a lifetime of new friends and families embraced her in the darkest days of life when her daughter, Brittanee seemingly vanished off the face of the earth while visiting Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. On the negative side, there was indescribable loss, longing and “if only’s.”

What has not been said about Brittanee’s case? There’s been speculation, rumor, inertia, some facts, as well as a fierce dedication to the mission of locating her at any cost by the Cue Center for Missing Persons and other entities.  Brittanee represents all missing persons of her generation. This has been a heavy burden for the Drexel family and all parents of missing children.

 

Her cell phone’s last communication was emitted from a tower in McClellenville, S.C. – about 60 miles or an hour and 20 minute drive from Myrtle Beach.

Abduction and possible human trafficking has been among the strongest theories to date. However, the strongest injustice has been the “conspiracy of silence” from the other parties involved, which is crushing to one’s soul! How can it be after seven years ,that NO ONE has come forward to give a substantial lead? And yet, they carry on…

A Candlelight Vigil is planned for Brittanee on the 7th Anniversary at the Market Common where a tree was planted in her honor. See details –https://www.facebook.com/events/972518209461981/

Anyone with information regarding Drexel’s whereabouts or her disappearance is asked to call the Myrtle Beach Police Department at 843-918-1963 or the CUE Center for Missing Persons’ 24 hour tip line at 910-232-1687.

My Personal Thanks

This, my fourth year of involvement and service to the Cue Center was an overwhelmingly rewarding Conference in so many ways, I never could have imagined!

DRGAwards2016I received a multitude of awards, including a Volunteer Service Award, the Keeper of the Flame Award, the Passages Award in memory of Susan Murphy Milano, and a beautiful wood carving with a message of hope.  These accolades were befitting of so many among me, and yet I was chosen – what an honor!

And yet, with all of these accolades, the most meaningful aspects for me, was the   sense of belonging to something very worthwhile, a cause larger than life itself, a commitment  to the people- the families, the volunteers,  and their stores,. It meant the opportunity to learn more from Monica and the presenters and instructors. I thank Monica and her staff for their kindnesses toward me, the sense of appreciation and confidence in my skills, which was heretofore not fully known to me. You could have knocked me over with a feather… several times!

Susan Murphy-Milano – I would be remiss if I did not relate my gratitude to my former earthly and now spiritual connection to dear friend, advocate, mentor and fellow homicide survivor, Susan Murphy Milano.  Susan was special to many people. She sacrificed so much, helped thousands of victims, and defended her innovative methods and amazing track record, particularly in assisting those experiencing intimate partner and family violence.  She made an indelible impression on my life.  I believe she was “observing from the great beyond” in Wilmington,” embracing me through Monica Caison and Peggy Bettis at the podium. How I miss her!

Monica Caison – The voice for missing persons and unsolved homicides whose selflessness and dedication continues to inspire me and countless others across the nation. I’ve learned she is a keen observer of all of her charges, who gives you autonomy and the ability to learn and grow over time. Monica quietly appreciates dedication, quality work, and those with compassion and a giving nature. I love that she embraces mankind, of every walk of life or circumstance,  uses selective compliments peppered with a kidding nature and self-deprecating humor!   She sees to it that every single family feels as if they are the only ones who matter!

No, she deserved to be found… and I’m sure we all walked away with life lessons that day. We all need to matter. We all need to be loved by someone.     We all need to be found. But more importantly, all need to be searched for.” Monica Caison 

Peggy Bettis – A trusted friend and supporter, was front and center. Her selflessness was demonstrated in ways that can never truly be measured, except in our hearts! She too has enriched my life immeasurably!

It’s the Little Things That Count too;

Thank you to Rachael Smith for showing care and concern for my food allergies. Thanks to James “Hambone” Hamm for being my special golf cart chauffeur.  Thanks to all of the State Coordinators who are so friendly and don’t mind that I’m “a Yankee” at heart! LOL

Coming Full Circle

With an average of over 500 new cases served per year, (2013 Stats,) Hope is not strictly defined. It can come in the form of “just carrying on” daily with the support of others, or achieving resolution such as a tragic, fateful end or the recovery of a person and potential reuniting with a family!  Our emotions, our bodies, our minds and our souls take the ultimate toll in this process.  We are never, ever the same again, no matter what the outcome.   All things considered, Monica Caison and the Cue Center is there for everyone, answering the call!

To Donate: http://www.ncmissingpersons.org/category/donate/

“I wake up softly entering my day, to only wonder who will be found along the way.”  Monica Caison 

References: http://www.starnewsonline.com/article/20160318/NEWS/160319622;

http://myinforms.com/en-gb/a/27667532-mother-of-ebonee-spears-speaks-at-missing-persons-conference/

http://www.wect.com/story/31329420/ebonee

http://www.wect.com/story/31026998/ebonee-spears-mom-best-friend-say-police-offer-little-help-in-search-for-missing-woman

http://portcitydaily.com/2016/01/29/tips-pour-in-as-police-search-for-wilmington-mom-missing-for-two-weeks/

http://www.chicoer.com/article/NA/20160313/NEWS/160319899

http://www.chicoer.com/article/ZZ/20120924/NEWS/120929822